盗まれた手紙【4】

The Purloined Letter

Photo by Anni Roenkae on Pexels.com

エドガー・アラン・ポーの「盗まれた手紙」の続きです.もうちょっとだけ続くんじゃ.過去の内容はこちらから.

In about a month afterwards he paid us another visit, and found us occupied very nearly as before. He took a pipe and a chair and entered into some ordinary conversation. At length I said,––

“Well, but G––, what of the purloined letter? I presume you have at last made up your mind that there is no such thing as overreaching the Minister?”

“Confound him, say I ––yes; I made the reexamination, however, as Dupin suggested ––but it was all labor lost, as I knew it would be.”

“How much was the reward offered, did you say?” asked Dupin.

“Why, a very great deal ––a very liberal reward ––I don’t like to say how much, precisely; but one thing I will say, that I wouldn’t mind giving my individual check for fifty thousand francs to any one who could obtain me that letter. The fact is, it is becoming of more and more importance every day; and the reward has been lately doubled. If it were trebled, however, I could do no more than I have done.”

“Why, yes,” said Dupin, drawlingly, between the whiffs of his meerschaum, “I really ––think, G––, you have not exerted yourself––to the utmost in this matter. You might ––do a little more, I think, eh?”

“How? ––In what way?”

“Why ––puff, puff ––you might ––puff, puff ––employ counsel in the matter, eh? ––puff, puff, puff. Do you remember the story they tell of Abernethy?”

“No; hang Abernethy!”

“To be sure! hang him and welcome. But, once upon a time, a certain rich miser conceived the design of spunging upon this Abernethy for a medical opinion. Getting up, for this purpose, an ordinary conversation in a private company, he insinuated his case to the physician, as that of an imaginary individual.

“‘We will suppose,’ said the miser, ‘that his symptoms are such and such; now, doctor, what would you have directed him to take?’

“‘Take!’ said Abernethy, ‘why, take advice, to be sure.'”

“But,” said the Prefect, a little discomposed, “I am perfectly willing to take advice, and to pay for it. I would really give fifty thousand francs to any one who would aid me in the matter.”

“In that case,” replied Dupin, opening a drawer, and producing a check-book, “you may as well fill me up a check for the amount mentioned. When you have signed it, I will hand you the letter.”

I was astounded. The Prefect appeared absolutely thunderstricken. For some minutes he remained speechless and motionless, less, looking incredulously at my friend with open mouth, and eyes that seemed starting from their sockets; then, apparently in some measure, he seized a pen, and after several pauses and vacant stares, finally filled up and signed a check for fifty thousand francs, and handed it across the table to Dupin. The latter examined it carefully and deposited it in his pocket-book; then, unlocking an escritoire, took thence a letter and gave it to the Prefect. This functionary grasped it in a perfect agony of joy, opened it with a trembling hand, cast a rapid glance at its contents, and then, scrambling and struggling to the door, rushed at length unceremoniously from the room and from the house, without having uttered a syllable since Dupin had requested him to fill up the check.

When he had gone, my friend entered into some explanations.

“The Parisian police,” he said, “are exceedingly able in their way. They are persevering, ingenious, cunning, and thoroughly versed in the knowledge which their duties seem chiefly to demand. Thus, when G–– detailed to us his mode of searching the premises at the Hotel D––, I felt entire confidence in his having made a satisfactory investigation ––so far as his labors extended.”

“So far as his labors extended?” said I.

“Yes,” said Dupin. “The measures adopted were not only the best of their kind, but carried out to absolute perfection. Had the letter been deposited within the range of their search, these fellows would, beyond a question, have found it.”

I merely laughed ––but he seemed quite serious in all that he said.

“The measures, then,” he continued, “were good in their kind, and well executed; their defect lay in their being inapplicable to the case, and to the man. A certain set of highly ingenious resources are, with the Prefect, a sort of Procrustean bed, to which he forcibly adapts his designs. But he perpetually errs by being too deep or too shallow, for the matter in hand; and many a schoolboy is a better reasoner than he. I knew one about eight years of age, whose success at guessing in the game of ‘even and odd’ attracted universal admiration. This game is simple, and is played with marbles. One player holds in his hand a number of these toys, and demands of another whether that number is even or odd. If the guess is right, the guesser wins one; if wrong, he loses one. The boy to whom I allude won all the marbles of the school. Of course he had some principle of guessing; and this lay in mere observation and admeasurement of the astuteness of his opponents. For example, an arrant simpleton is his opponent, and, holding up his closed hand, asks, ‘are they even or odd?’ Our schoolboy replies, ‘odd,’ and loses; but upon the second trial he wins, for he then says to himself, the simpleton had them even upon the first trial, and his amount of cunning is just sufficient to make him have them odd upon the second; I will therefore guess odd’; –he guesses odd, and wins. Now, with a simpleton a degree above the first, he would have reasoned thus: ‘This fellow finds that in the first instance I guessed odd, and, in the second, he will propose to himself upon the first impulse, a simple variation from even to odd, as did the first simpleton; but then a second thought will suggest that this is too simple a variation, and finally he will decide upon putting it even as before. I will therefore guess even’ guesses even, and wins. Now this mode of reasoning in the schoolboy, whom his fellows termed “lucky,” ––what, in its last analysis, is it?”

“It is merely,” I said, “an identification of the reasoner’s intellect with that of his opponent.”

“It is,” said Dupin;” and, upon inquiring of the boy by what means he effected the thorough identification in which his success consisted, I received answer as follows: ‘When I wish to find out how wise, or how stupid, or how good, or how wicked is any one, or what are his thoughts at the moment, I fashion the expression of my face, as accurately as possible, in accordance with the expression of his, and then wait to see what thoughts or sentiments arise in my mind or heart, as if to match or correspond with the expression.’ This response of the schoolboy lies at the bottom of all the spurious profundity which has been attributed to Rochefoucauld, to La Bougive, to Machiavelli, and to Campanella.”

“And the identification,” I said, “of the reasoner’s intellect with that of his opponent, depends, if I understand you aright upon the accuracy with which the opponent’s intellect is admeasured.”

それからおよそ一ヶ月が過ぎて彼は再び訪れ、彼は我々が以前とほとんど同じようにしているのを認めた.彼はパイプを咥え椅子に腰掛け、いくらか世間話をし始めた.しばらくして私はこう言った.

「それでG––殿、盗まれた手紙はどうなりましたか.大臣にたどり着くような手がかりはないとあなたはとうとう決心されたのではないですか」

「全く忌々しい、そうだ.だがね、私はもう一度調べたのだ.デュパンが言うように.しかし、私の思ったとおりすべて徒労に終わった」

「提示された報酬はいくらと仰りましたか」とデュパンが尋ねた.

「いや、非常に高額で、気前の良い報酬なのだが、どれだけかはあまり正確に言いたくない.しかし、一つ言うとすれば、私にあの手紙を手渡せる人がいるならば、五万フランの個人の小切手をあげたって構わない.事実を言えば、ことは日を追うごとに次第に重大になっている.そして報酬も倍額となったばかりだ.しかしもし三倍になったとしても私はもはや今までした以上のことができそうもない」

「そうですか.私は本当はね、G––殿、あなたはまだもう少し骨を折ってもいいと思っていますよ.その最大の事案に対してね.もう少し努力なさってもいいでしょう.私はそう思いますがね」

「どうやって.どうしろと言うのだね」

「どうって(スパスパ)この件に関して助言を聞くのが(スパスパ)良かったでしょうに.あなたは(スパスパスパ)アバナシー*の話を覚えていますか」

*ジョン・アバナシー(John Abernethy)は実在した英国の外科医.

「知るか.アバナシーなどくたばってしまえ」

「もちろんですとも.くたばってしまえばよろしい.ですが、ある時、とある吝嗇な金持ちがアバナシーに医学的な意見をただで尋ねる案を思いついたのでした.すると、この目的のために、私的な仲間との世間話で、彼は外科医に、架空の個人についての症例としてほのめかしたのです」

「『彼の症状は斯々然々だと我々は思うのですがね、先生、彼はどんなものを使えば良いでしょうか』と吝嗇家が言ったのだそうです.

『使ってしまえ.医者の助言を使えばいいだろう』とアバナシーが言ったのだとか」

「しかし、私は助言を使うことにすっかり同意するし、それに対しては謝礼もするがね.私にこの件で支援してくれるものなら誰にでも五万フランを本当にあげようと思っている」と総監は少しむっとして言った.

「その場合なら、あなたが仰った額を私の小切手に記載しても良いと思いますよ.あなたがサインしてくださるのなら、私はあなたに手紙をお渡ししましょう」とデュパンは引き出しを開けて、小切手帳を取り出しながら返事をした.

私は呆然とした.警視総監は完全に雷に打たれたように見えた.数分の間彼は無言無動のまま、口を開けたまま私の友人を信じがたい目線で見つめ、目玉が穴から飛び出たように見えた.それから、我に返り、ペンを手にとって、何度も止まったり空を見つめながらようやく五万ドルを小切手に書き、テーブル越しにデュパンに渡した.デュパンは注意深く小切手を見つめ小切手帳にしまった.そして、書き物机の鍵を開けて、一通の手紙を警視総監に手渡した.総監は狂喜に満ちて受け取り、震える手で手紙を開けた.その内容を素早く一瞥すると、あわてて扉へ駆け込み、デュパンが小切手に記入するよう述べてから一言も言わず、邸宅から、部屋から非礼にも飛び出した.

彼が去った後、私の友人は説明をし始めた.

「パリ市警は彼らの流儀においては非常に有能だ.彼らは根気強く、独創的で、狡猾で、彼らの業務で主に求められる知識に徹底的に通じている.こうして、G––がD––の邸宅の敷地の調査の流儀を詳細に語ったとき、私は彼が、彼の力の及ぶ限り、満足の行く調査を成し遂げたという自身に満ちていたように感じたのさ」

「力の限りだって」と私が言った.

「ああ、用いられた調査は彼らの中で最善であっただけでなく、完璧に実行された.もしも手紙が彼らの調査範囲内にあったならば、奴らは疑いなく、見つけたに違いないね」とデュパンが言った.

私はただ笑うだけだった.しかし彼は自分の言ったことについて大真面目のように見えた.

「その調査方法は、彼らのやり方では良いものだったし、良く実行されたと思う.欠点は、彼らのやり方がこの事件に、その人物に適用できなかったことにある.高度に優れた方法というのは、総監にとって、プロクルステスの寝台*のように、無理やり自分の計画を適応させようとするからなのさ.しかし、彼はあまりにも深みに入りすぎたか、浅すぎるために、自分の扱う事件に対していつも間違いを犯すのだ.彼よりも分別のある学童はたくさんいる.私が知っているのは八歳の子で、『丁か半か』のゲームで当てるのがうまくてみんなから称賛を集めていたんだ.このゲームは単純で、丸石を使って遊ぶ.一人のプレイヤーが手に丸石を何個かもち、他方がその数が偶数か奇数かを当てる.もし推測が正しければ、その人は石を一つもらう.間違えれば一つ失う.私が言った子は学校中の石を勝ち取ってしまったのさ.もちろん彼は推測についてある原則を持っていた.このことはただ観察と相手に対する抜け目のない洞察にある.例えば、彼の相手が全くの間抜けだとすると、手を閉じたまま、『丁か半か』と尋ねる.学童は『半だ』と答えて負ける.しかし、二度目で彼は勝つ.というのは彼は次のように考えるんだ.この間抜けははじめのゲームで丁で勝った、そしてこいつの利口さならば、二度目は半という程度だろう、と.それなら半と言おう、と思って半と言って勝つ.さて、はじめの間抜けよりも少し上のやつには、彼はこのように考える.『こいつははじめに僕が半だと言ったと気づく.そして二回目はすぐに、丁から半へ、先程の間抜けがやったように単純に変えてくるだろう.けれども、あまりにも単純すぎると思い直し、結局こいつは前と同じ丁だと決めるだろう.だから僕は丁にしよう』と言って丁だと言う.そして勝つ.さてこの学童、みんなから『運がいい』と言われた子の推理の方法は、最後まで分析すると、これは一体何なのだろうか」

プロクルステスの寝台*古代ギリシアの強盗の名前.人を捕えるごとに鉄の寝床に寝かせ、その身長が寝台より長いときはその余った部分を斬り縮め、短かければ引き延ばして同じ長さにして殺したと言われる.

「それはただ、推理者の知力が相手の推理力を一致させることだろう」と私は言った.

「そうさ.そして少年に尋ねてみた.彼の成功に寄与する完全な一致とはどのような方法なのか、とね.そして私は次のような答えを得た.『誰が賢いか、間抜けなのか、良い人なのか、悪い人なのかを知りたいとき、または相手は何を考えているのか知りたいときに、僕は自分の顔を、相手の表情とできるだけそっくりになるように真似するんです.そして自分のこころにのぼってくる考えや気持ちが、まるでその表情とぴったりしっくりするように見て待つんです』この学童の答えはロシュフコー*やラ・ブリュイエール*、マキャベリ*、そしてカンパネラ*のものだとされているあらゆる見せかけの深淵さよりもはるかに奥底にあるものさ」

ロシュフコー* フランソワ・ドゥ・ラ・ロシュフコーはフランスの貴族、文学者.「箴言集」の著者で知られる.

ラ・ブリュイエール* ジャン・ド・ラ・ブリュイエール:フランスの作家.Bruyèreが一般的な名前で知られる.

マキャベリ* ニコロ・マキャベリ.イタリアの政治家、著作家.

カンパネラ* トマソ・カンパネラ、イタリアの聖職者、哲学者.

「そして、推理者の知力を相手のものと一致させることは、私が君をちゃんと理解している限り、相手の知力を正確に図ること次第なのだね」と私が言った.

デュパンが引いたゲームの得意な少年の話、面白いなぁと思いました.ここまでありがとうございました.まだ続きますよー

誰がどれだけ賢いか、どれだけ間抜けなのか、良い人なのか、悪い人なのかを知りたいとき、または相手は何を考えているのか知りたいときに、僕は自分の顔を、相手の表情とできるだけそっくりになるように真似するんです.そして自分のこころにのぼってくる考えや気持ちが、まるでその表情とぴったりしっくりくるように見て待つんです.

When I wish to find out how wise, or how stupid, or how good, or how wicked is any one, or what are his thoughts at the moment, I fashion the expression of my face, as accurately as possible, in accordance with the expression of his, and then wait to see what thoughts or sentiments arise in my mind or heart, as if to match or correspond with the expression.

投稿者:

吾郎

2020年6月にブログ開設.生き延びるための様々な問題を精神病理学に基づいて取り扱っています!ぜひぜひ気軽に遊びに来て下さいね.Our articles include essay, translation, study about literature, psychiatry(psychopathology), humanities.